Tickets and Sponsorships

  

This year, as for the past 33 years, the Les Turner ALS Foundation will bring together Chicago's top minds in ALS research and care, business, academics, philanthropy, and most importantly, people living with ALS, for one of the city's most elegant and most prestigious black-tie optional events of the year: the 34th Annual Hope Through Caring Gala, at the Radisson Blu Aqua Hotel on Saturday, April 2, 2022. 

As part of our commitment to health and safety, Hope Though Caring Gala attendees must provide proof of full Covid vaccination (including booster) in order to participate in this event.  Proof of a negative Covid-19 test may also be required (more information to follow).  

Harvey and Bonny Gaffen Advancements in ALS Award
Joshua Cohen and Justin Klee

  

  

The Harvey and Bonny Gaffen Advancements in ALS Award honorees are Joshua Cohen and Justin Klee.  Josh co-founded Amylyx Pharmaceuticals in 2013 and has served since that time as its Co-CEO, its Co-Founder, and as Chairman of the board of directors. Josh co-invented AMX0035 and has overseen the growth of Amylyx from its start as a concept dreamed up in a dorm room to its status now as a pre-commercial stage pharmaceutical company. 

Justin co-founded Amylyx Pharmaceuticals in 2013 and continues to serve as its Co-CEO and Co-Founder. Justin has overseen the development of Amylyx's novel platform and therapeutic for neurodegenerative diseases from initial testing through clinical trials.

Their investigational treatment for ALS, AMX0035, was recently submitted to the FDA and is in Phase 3 clinical trial that is available at our Les Turner ALS Center at Northwestern Medicine.

 Hope Through Caring Award 
Lisa F. Wolfe, MD

  

Our Hope Through Caring Award honoree, Lisa F. Wolfe, MD of Northwestern Medicine, is a world-renowned pulmonologist at our Lois Insolia ALS Clinic at the Les Turner ALS Center and pioneer in the field of ALS respiratory care. For the past 20 years, Dr. Wolfe has built one of most respected neuromuscular pulmonary failure programs in the country, which has led to speaking opportunities around the world.  

Dr. Wolfe is a staunch advocate for individuals with ALS and their families and it is her mission to share her knowledge with others, so that all people living with ALS get the best possible respiratory support. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Wolfe has published over 50 papers in the literature, with a focus on respiratory support for neuromuscular disease. Understanding the importance of early intervention, Dr. Wolfe developed a process for aggressively screening patients for respiratory muscle weakness and has been on the forefront of airway clearance techniques to help prevent respiratory infections.

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Support our mission to provide the most comprehensive care and support to people living with ALS and their families so they can confidently navigate the disease, and advance scientific research for the prevention, treatment, and cure of ALS

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About the Les Turner ALS Foundation

Founded in 1977, the Les Turner ALS Foundation is Chicagoland's leader in comprehensive ALS care and one of the longest-serving ALS groups in the country.

Throughout our history, we have taken an individualized approach to ensure each person living with the disease receives the best quality of care and access to the most promising therapies. We treat each person like family, supporting them every step of the way, and provide their loved ones with answers and encouragement.

Our Les Turner ALS Center at Northwestern Medicine is led by the most well-respected and successful clinicians and researchers in the field, advancing vital care and research in pursuit of life-enhancing treatments and a cure.

 

About ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a terminal, progressive disease that causes muscle weakness, difficulty speaking and swallowing and, generally, complete paralysis. ALS can, in some cases, also cause changes in intellectual function, mood, behavior or personality. While technically considered a "rare disease," experts predict an individual's lifetime risk of acquiring ALS is about 1 in 300, by the age of 85. There is no cure, yet.

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Les Turner ALS Foundation
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